Tuesday, 13 December 2016


This post includes the complete text of Plan A for free. Plan A can also be purchased in e-book format by following the link below.



If humanity collectively follows Plan A natural resources will be conserved, technology will be used effectively and people will work a maximum of four hours a day.
Plan A








Plan A
Published by J.S. Allen 2016
© J.S. Allen 2016
J.S. Allen
The moral right of the author has been asserted
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted, in any form or by any means without the prior permission in writing of J.S. Allen. You must not submit this book in any other binding or cover.



        Contents









Introduction

 
Plan A provides an overview of corporate-industrial society and precepts to follow on an individual basis which will transform its social and economic structure.



Food

 
One-third of the planet’s arable land is used for livestock feed crop cultivation. Producing 1kg of beef requires 70 times as much land as 1kg of vegetables. It takes more than 2,400 gallons of water to produce 1 pound of meat while growing one pound of wheat requires only 25 gallons of water. Animal agriculture accounts for at least half of all human-caused greenhouse gases.  
Intensive animal agriculture creates public health problems. Human consumption of meat, dairy products and eggs is implicated in obesity, diabetes, heart disease and cancer. Bacteria in animal waste contaminates drinking water, waterways and causes human illnesses. Workers in the meat industry suffer repetitive stress injuries in their hands, wrist, arms, shoulders and back.
Factory farmed animals lead a life of misery from the moment they are born. Millions of animals are crammed into windowless sheds, wire cages and metal crates. Animals are slaughtered when their bodies have been worn out from producing milk or eggs; many remain conscious when they are boiled, skinned or hacked apart on production lines.
Following a plant-based diet on an individual basis stops animal suffering, protects the environment and improves health.
A plant-based diet includes:
·         Fruits
·         Vegetables
·         Nuts
·         Seeds
·         Legumes
·         Grains
·         Plant-based foods fortified with vitamin B12 and vitamin D

Evidence based reviews have shown that excluding animal products from the human diet lowers the risk of obesity, type 2 diabetes,  heart disease and cancer. 



Water

 
Demand for meat and superfluous products reduces the Earth’s supply of safe drinking water. Developed countries take three times the volume of water from rivers than fifty years ago. It takes more than 2,400 gallons of water to produce 1 pound of meat, while growing 1 pound of wheat requires only 25 gallons of water. Bacteria in animal waste contaminates drinking water and waterways. Water is used to extract raw materials, for chemical substances and industrial cooling. Manufacturing uses around ten to one hundred times a product’s mass in water during the production process. It takes seven litres of water to produce a one litre plastic bottle.
Recycling (reuse), limiting possessions to the bare necessities (essential clothing, bedding, utensils and backpack) and following a plant-based diet on an individual basis saves water. Extracting virgin materials to make new products uses high volumes of water. Carrying a flask, canvas shopping bag and other reusable items reduces demand for virgin materials. Donating or recycling superfluous possessions reduces demand for virgin materials. Excluding animal products from the human diet cuts down on water use.



Light

 
The human biological clock regulates body temperature, water content, appetite, sleep cycles, salt concentration in the bloodstream, blood glucose levels and blood oxygen level. Melatonin is a brain hormone that measures the timing of a mammal's circadian rhythms. Melatonin is undetectable during the daytime, but later emerges in dim light. Melatonin is detected in blood and salivaat about 21:00. Exposure to artificial light delays circadian rhythms through the suppression of melatonin. Suppression of melatonin production is linked to cancer, exacerbation of cardiovascular disease and psychological stress.
People work around the clock in corporate-industrial society to keep up with consumer demand for superfluous products and services. Recycling, limiting possessions to the bare necessities and following a plant-based diet on an individual basis will cut demand for artificial light – production will shrink and working hours will reduce.  



Clothing

 
In the past people owned just a few items of clothing and repaired worn items. As industry grew, manufacturing costs reduced and disposable income increased throwaway fashion became popular.
Millions of animals are killed for the clothing industry. Animals are crammed into windowless sheds, wire cages and metal crates; many remain conscious when they are skinned or hacked apart on production lines. The textile dyeing and finishing industry uses large volumes of water and toxic chemicals. Workers in the textile industry suffer repetitive stress injuries in their hands, wrist, arms, shoulders and back, straining to meet high production targets.
A change of clothes and a few extra items for inclement weather is sufficient for one’s needs (excess clothing can be given away). Washing and repairing clothing is a simple process if one owns only the bare necessities. Choosing good quality fabric, dark colours to hide permanent staining, and repairing worn items extends the life of clothing. Buying second-hand clothing saves resources. Purchasing alternatives to animal skin, wool, and silk stops animal suffering.
Dressing simply and ethically improves the lives of workers and protects all life on Earth. Production slows and workers have free time to develop their communities. More land is available to grow plant-based foods and regenerate wildlife.



Architecture

 
Architecture evolves when individuals recycle, limit possessions to the bare necessities (essential clothing, bedding, utensils and backpack) and follow a plant-based diet. Live and work spaces are unornamented and spacious  windows frame the changing picture of nature. People pack only essential clothing, bedding and utensils when moving.
Good design complements simple living. Designing homes and other spaces with built-in platforms for relaxing/sleeping, built-in tables and wooden or tiled flooring reduces labour and saves resources. Manufacturing furniture and carpets wastes resources.



Medicine

 
Millions of people are injured, killed and suffer with poor health in corporate-industrial society. Workers engage in tasks that are unsafe, repetitive, unnatural and unnecessary. Each year an estimated 160 million new cases of work-related diseases occur worldwide including: respiratory disease, cardiovascular disease, cancer, hearing loss, musculoskeletal disorders, reproductive disorders and neurological illnesses. Each year work-related injuries and diseases kill an estimated 1.1 million people and injure an estimated 250 million. Mental health problems, hypertension, obesity, diabetes and substance abuse are also common in corporate-industrial society.
A common health condition in corporate-industrial society is the proverbial “bad back”. Many workers suffer with musculoskeletal disorders of the spine from sitting at desks, lifting superfluous products and standing for long periods. Office workers sit for long periods in front of computer screens to facilitate the production and delivery of superfluous products. Workers deliver heavy superfluous products to customers. Salespeople in the retail industry stand for long periods selling superfluous products to customers.
Intensive animal agriculture creates public health problems. Human consumption of meat, dairy products and eggs is implicated in obesity, diabetes, heart disease and cancer. Bacteria in animal waste contaminates drinking water, waterways and causes human illnesses. Workers in the meat industry suffer repetitive stress injuries in their hands, wrist, arms, shoulders and back.
Recycling, limiting possessions to the bare necessities and following a plant-based diet on an individual basis will significantly reduce the number of sick, injured and disabled people on Earth and transform the medical industry.



Health

 
Buying exercise machines and joining commercial gyms is not consistent with a natural simple life. Producing fitness equipment wastes resources (metal and oil).  Walking and calisthenics is more than adequate for maintaining strength, stamina, flexibility, agility and good health. Using body weight to maintain fitness is portable, inexpensive and conserves resources.



Cosmetics

 
Millions of people habitually use soap and shampoo. Supermarkets, pharmacies and health food shops sell a plethora of useless cosmetics to millions of misinformed consumers.
Sebum is an oily secretion produced by sebaceous glands, which are tiny ducts adjacent to hair follicles. The main role of sebum is to waterproof skin and hair. Sweat is a salty, watery solution produced by numerous microscopic channels opening on to the skin’s surface called sweat glands. As sebum and sweat mix on the skin’s surface, a protective layer called the acid mantle forms. The acid mantle inhibits the growth of harmful bacteria and fungi. If the acid mantle loses its acidity the skin becomes prone to damage and infection. Washing the skin and hair with soap and shampoo strips away the acid mantle.
Water alone cleanses the human body. Using the hand, a brush or a wash cloth provides the friction needed to remove dead skin and dirt.
Drier skin is a natural consequence of aging. Skin loses its elasticity as we age. Chemicals from cosmetics are absorbed by our largest organ, the skin. The best methods to keep skin healthy are to avoid cosmetics (soap, shampoo, deodorant, skin cream, makeup and hair dye), drink plenty of water, eat a whole food plant-based diet and minimise sun exposure to prevent wrinkling.   
Modern cosmetics pollute the human body, water and land. Rejecting cosmetics improves  health, frees workers from superfluous tasks and protects the environment.



Cleaning

 
Commercial cleaning products pollute the environment. Natural cleaning products protect the environment. Vinegar is a natural disinfectant. Lemon juice is a natural bleach. Baking soda is a versatile non-abrasive cleaner. Completely biodegradable soap nuts from the soapberry tree are ideal for washing clothing. Biodegradable pure-castile soap is useful for washing clothing, dishes and surfaces.
Owning superfluous possessions complicates cleaning tasks. Limiting personal possessions to the bare necessities simplifies cleaning tasks: essential clothing, bedding, utensils and backpack.



Education

 
Conventional educational establishments will transform as people recycle, limit personal possessions to the bare necessities and follow a plant-based diet. The volume of information students learn will reduce as industrial production shrinks. Educational institutions will become open learning labs, where students develop freely – learning will be informal and self-directed.



Information

 
Overproduction creates pointless information and bureaucracy. The human brain is the most complex object in the known universe.  Pointless information impairs the human brain. Recycling, limiting possessions to the bare necessities and following a plant-based diet on an individual basis will reduce the volume of information and bureaucracy in corporate-industrial society – human beings will have time to develop the mind.



Work

 
Millions of people produce superfluous products in factories, deliver superfluous products to retail outlets and process superfluous waste. People engage in work that is repetitive, dull, degrading and unnecessary in order to satisfy each other’s desire for superfluous products.    
Recycling, limiting possessions to the bare necessities and following a plant-based diet on an individual basis breaks down the infrastructure that creates dissatisfied and overworked citizens – overproduction stops, businesses shrink and working hours reduce. World trade is limited to resources that cannot be obtained locally, automation is used effectively and people work a maximum of four hours a day.



Toys

 
Buying toys is a poor substitute for affection and a natural environment. Natural play is free of commerce, unrestricted and inventive.



Pets

 
Humans breed and capture animals for profit and personal entertainment. Animals are kept in cages, underfed, overfed, neglected, abandoned and suffer with painful conditions from forced breeding. Millions of unwanted pets are destroyed each year. .
Dogs were domesticated from grey wolves over 15,000 years ago. The genetic diversity of wolves has declined as wild habitats have shrunk. Most dog breeds have been selectively bred.  The world’s dog population is over 400 million. 
The cat was domesticated in Egypt over 4,000 years ago. Domestic cats are descendants of European and African wild cats.Domestic cats are not a natural part of the Earth’s ecosystem. The world’s cat population is over 500 million. Domestic cats kill hundreds of millions of birds each year and more than a billion small mammals.
Humans enslave horses, elephants, fish, birds and many other animals. Horses are used for sport. Elephants are captured and forced to entertain tourists. Fish are stolen from the ocean and displayed in aquariums like ornaments. Birds are imprisoned in small cages never to experience the freedom of long distance flight.
The majority of domestic pets are fed processed food. The pet food industry is worth billions. Some of the largest pet food manufacturers are subsidiaries of major multinationals. Multinationals pass on agricultural waste to the pet food industry for reprocessing. Some of the ingredients contained in pet food includes: cow brains, sheep guts, chicken heads, foetal tissue, diseased or disabled dead animals and rancid grain; poor quality ingredients are fortified with vitamins, minerals, and coloured with artificial dyes. Animals are bred by humans, and then fed to pets bred by humans – needless suffering to satisfy human whims.
Pet owners purchase a range of superfluous products at superstores, which add to environmental pollution: pet food, cages, aquarium, pet nail clippers, cat scratching posts, digital pet feeders, dog clipper sets, dog toilets, bark control spray, dog beds, pet shampoo, and plastic pet toys.
If human beings avoid pet ownership and switch to a plant-based diet the needless suffering of animals will stop, the pet industry will collapse, workers will be freed from superfluous tasks, wildlife will have space to flourish and Earth’s resources will be conserved for future generations.



Furniture

 
Designing, producing, selling, transporting, maintaining and disposing superfluous furniture requires a large infrastructure. Modern homes contain a plethora of furniture made from natural and synthetic materials.
Manufacturers developed laminated plywood, plastics and fibreglass in the 1940s. New production methods enabled furniture manufacturers to increase output, sell items at lower prices and reach a wider market. Consumers replaced furniture in line with changing fashions.
Good design simplifies manufacturing, recycling and reduces labour. Furniture designers use composite materials unnecessarily. Why use a material simply because it is new? A wooden chair and desk is simple to manufacture and recycle. A plastic chair is complicated to manufacture and recycle. Designing new homes with built-in platform seating for relaxing/sleeping and built-in kitchen tables saves resources and simplifies moving.
Modern furniture has a negative impact on human health. Sitting on sofa chairs causes the body to become hunched and interferes with lung capacity. Modern mattresses disrupt natural alignment, causing the hips to sink in and the lower back to collapse. The Human body is not designed to sit on sofas and sleep on soft artificial mattresses. Training the body to sit and sleep on the floor is good for the spine, promotes deep breathing and saves resources.
Producing, purchasing, transporting and maintaining superfluous furniture wastes resources. Sleeping on the floor and designing homes with built-in furniture made from natural or recycled materials saves resources, reduces labour and improves human health.



Jewellery

 
Human beings have adorned their bodies for thousands of years. Adornment was used a signal for attracting mates, distinguished individuals as part of a group and acted as a status symbol. Early humans used seeds, bone, feathers and shells to make jewellery. Today jewellers’ use materials (precious metals and gemstones) that are difficult to excavate and process.
Worldwide jewellery sales have grown in line with advanced manufacturing techniques, advertising, affluence and globalisation. Modern jewellery production damages the environment. Trace metal pollution from mining and processing industries associated with the jewellery industry affects the health of plants, animals and humans. Heavy metals persist in soil and rock for decades.
Adornment is superficial. Beauty is within. Living simply and ethically attracts others: recycling, limiting possessions to the bare necessities and following a plant-based diet.



Art

 
Making, buying and selling art has become an obsession in corporate-industrial society. Art supply stores sell an array of products for practicing artists and hobbyists: paper, sketchbooks, ready-made canvases, frames, spray paint, tape, and acrylic paint. Private collectors, corporations and institutions in corporate-industrial society spend large sums of money on “art.” Museums and galleries sell mass-produced souvenirs of original art: framed prints, fridge magnets and puzzles. Lifestyle magazines, books and cultural programs on television promote art.
Completing large art projects and producing souvenirs requires chemicals, precious metals, steel, wood, paper, fabric, plastics and complex machinery. The Earth is mined and trees are destroyed to produce superfluous products.  
Living simply and protecting nature is art: recycling, limiting personal possessions to the bare necessities and following a plant-based diet.



Music

 
New sound technology changed human beings relationship with music. New generations heard music for the first time by buying records, listening to the radio or watching television programs. People experienced music by purchasing products instead of through grass roots communication (oral and memory).      
A silent desert, bird song, the flow of a river, and the human heartbeat are all forms of music. It is not necessary to engage in commerce, depend on complex production processes or use electricity to enjoy music.



Science

 
Science will be used in an effective manner when human beings collectively recycle, limit personal possessions to the bare necessities and follow a plant-based diet. When demand for superfluous products stops scientists’ will have time to focus on projects that protect the Earth.



Photography

 
Restricting photographs to essential documents frees one from the system. The present is multidimensional – sight, hearing, taste, smell and touch. Constant recording distracts one from living in the present.



Waste

 
Worldwide each year an estimated 2.6 trillion pounds of electronic goods, paper and other waste is discarded by households and businesses. Landfill, Incineration and recycling facilities are constantly expanding to deal with growing household and commercial waste.
Consumers regularly update computers, cell phones and other electronic devices. Obsolete technology is stored, dumped or recycled. Hazardous chemicals from electronic waste harms workers in recycling yards, leach into land and are released into the atmosphere.  
Over three billion trees are cut down each year for use in paper industries. Pulp and paper mills pollute air, water and land. Millions of pounds of highly toxic toluene, methanol, chlorine dioxide, hydrochloric acid and formaldehyde are released into the environment from paper making plants (humans are exposed to some of these chemicals when consuming meat and dairy products).  
Recycling anything that is superfluous to needs, limiting possessions to the bare necessities and following a plant-based diet on an individual basis will transform human society. Businesses and waste facilities will shrink as human beings consume less and reuse materials. Quality will improve. Automation will be used effectively. More land will be available for growing plant-based foods and encouraging wildlife. Resources will be divided equally. People will work a maximum of four hours a day.



Politics

 
Recycling, limiting possessions to the bare necessities and following a plant-based diet on an individual basis will transform corporate-industrial society’s political system. Industrial production will shrink, waste will decrease, quality will improve and local economies will strengthen. Resources will be divided equally. People will work a maximum of four hours a day. States will become direct democracies and members of government will work on a voluntary basis.



Economy

 
Recycling, limiting possessions to the bare necessities and following a plant-based diet on an individual basis will transform corporate-industrial society’s economic system: industrial production will shrink, waste will decrease, quality will improve and local economies will strengthen. Resources will be divided equally. People will work a maximum of four hours a day.



Business

 
Recycling, limiting possessions to the bare necessities and following a plant-based diet on an individual basis will encourage the growth of cooperatives. Businesses will shrink, merge and sell a limited number of sustainable products.
Cooperative: a cooperative is a limited liability business that can organize for-profit or not-for-profit. Its members share decision-making authority rather than shareholders.



Money

 
Is gold worth more than a seed? A seed can produce a tree. A tree can produce seeds, seeds can produce a forest and a forest can sustain many species. 
Recycling, limiting possessions to the bare necessities and following a plant-based diet on an individual basis will transform the money system. Systems dependent on false value will collapse; credit and debt will disappear as people provide for each other’s needs instead of wants.



Security

 
Locks, vaults, alarms, CCTV, cameras, tracking systems and security guards are used in corporate-industrial society to secure superfluous things. Recycling, limiting possessions to the bare necessities and following a plant-based diet on an individual basis is the most effective method for creating a secure society – nature, health and freedom are valued instead of things.



War

 
Materialism leads to war. People need a constant supply of resources from abroad to maintain overproduction. Recycling, limiting possessions to the bare necessities and following a plant-based diet on an individual basis prevents war.



Tourism

 
Tourism is increasing exponentially on Earth due to advances in technology and greater affluence. Mass tourism increases air emissions, energy use, noise, solid waste and sewage. Mass tourism strains the resources of small communities.
There are plenty of undiscovered places to explore in one’s local environment. If overseas travel is unavoidable stay in accommodation operated by local people, buy local plant-based produce, carry a reusable water bottle, use water and electricity sparingly, walk or use public transport.



Death

 
Limiting personal possessions to the bare necessities (essential clothing, bedding, utensils and backpack) simplifies death. In the event of a person’s death people can focus on celebrating their life rather than dividing and discarding their superfluous possessions.



Conclusion

 
Recycling, limiting personal possessions to the bare necessities and following a plant-based diet on an individual basis will create a Plan A society. Natural resources will be conserved, technology will be used effectively and people will work a maximum of four hours a day. Human habitats will integrate with nature. War will end. The social and economic structure of corporate-industrial society will transform. The three core precepts for creating a Plan A society are:

1. Recycle.
2. Limit personal possessions to the bare necessities:  essential clothing, bedding, utensils and backpack.   
3. Follow a plant-based diet.

The Future

Today in 2120 homes are simple. Built-in platforms for relaxing and sleeping are included in all rooms – people lay mats or cushions on top. Kitchens have built-in tables and benches. Floors are wooden or tiled. Windows are large. Living spaces are unornamented.
Moving is easy in the 22nd Century. Citizens of Earth own only the bare necessities: essential clothing, bedding, utensils and backpack. 
The human population follows a plant-based diet. There are vegetable gardens, greenhouses and forests where once there were farms enslaving animals. Every citizen has access to land for food growing.
Restaurants do not serve food in disposable packaging; people bring their own lightweight stainless steel containers if they want to take food away. Supermarkets have dispensers where people use reusable containers to stock up on dry goods.
Educational institutions are open to all. Learning is informal and self-directed. Students are provided with the resources they need to investigate any subject that holds their interest.
The publishing industry is small. Printed books are sent to public libraries. Citizens borrow printed books from well stocked public libraries. Adjacent to public libraries are stores where community members can borrow tools for free.
The public transport system is excellent. Buses, trams and trains run regularly. Roads in towns and cities are quiet.
Gyms and manufacturers of fitness equipment have closed down. People engage in natural forms of exercise. Calisthenics is popular.
One company manufactures appliances for the world in order to simplify manufacturing, repair and recycling. The average working day is four hours. People spend the rest of the day tending vegetable gardens, exercising or meditating.
Human health has improved dramatically since the 21st Century. Incidences of musculoskeletal disorders respiratory disease, cardiovascular disease, cancer, mental health problems, obesity, diabetes and substance abuse are low.

Plan A




Tuesday, 17 May 2016

Guide to Life in 100 Words

Plan A

Guide to Life in 100 Words 

Birth
You are born empty handed. 
Food
Following a plant-based diet is an immediate way to change the world.  
Clothing
Wearing clothes that are durable and utilitarian simplifies life.  
Shelter
A home is not a museum.  
Health
Walking and calisthenics costs nothing.  
Hygiene
Soaps and shampoos strip away the body’s natural oils.  
Sleep
Wake with the sunrise and rest with the sunset. 
Suffering
Suffering is caused by false judgements of value. 
Time
Time is more valuable than possessions.  
Conservation
A life lived according to nature requires only the bare necessities. 
Knowledge
Knowledge is within.  
Death
You die empty handed.
 
 

Plan A

Plan A


Plan A 

Plan A provides an overview of corporate-industrial society and precepts to follow on an individual basis which will transform its social and economic structure.
If humanity collectively follows Plan A natural resources will be conserved, technology will be used effectively and people will work a maximum of four hours a day.